Acute effects of weight training on glycaemia in type 1 diabetes

John Chisholm, Lynn Kilbride, Jacqui Charlton, John A. McKnight

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Exercise is regarded as a potential strategy to assist in the management of blood glucose in people with type 1 diabetes. However, currently there is little evidence‐based information detailing the acute effects weight training has on glycaemia in type 1 diabetes. The aim of this review is to identify studies investigating the acute effects of weight training on blood glucose levels in type 1 diabetes.

    A search of Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane, Medline and SPORTDiscus databases was conducted. A systematic review of these studies was undertaken to address the issue.

    After fulfilling the inclusion criteria, eight articles were retrieved. The individual studies reported comparatively different results.

    Study findings from this review are inconclusive regarding the acute glycaemic response to weight training exercise. Analyses of the intervention studies highlight that weight training may increase, minimally affect or decrease post‐exercise glycaemia in type 1 diabetes. It is likely that the heterogeneity regarding the weight training methods used among the studies, as well as the pre/post‐exercise insulin and carbohydrate intake of the study participants have impacted on the findings.

    There remains a gap in the evidence base to inform health care professionals of the likely acute glycaemic response to weight training exercise. Problems in managing patient glycaemia may arise due to erroneous insulin and carbohydrate alterations based on unfounded and anecdotal‐based guidance. The studies highlighted in this review have reported some of the potential effects that weight training may have on glycaemia.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)155–159
    Number of pages5
    JournalPractical Diabetes International
    Volume29
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2012

    Fingerprint

    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
    Weights and Measures
    Exercise
    Blood Glucose
    Carbohydrates
    Insulin
    Nursing
    Databases
    Delivery of Health Care
    Health

    Keywords

    • diabetes type 1
    • exercise
    • weight training
    • glycaemia

    Cite this

    Chisholm, John ; Kilbride, Lynn ; Charlton, Jacqui ; McKnight, John A. . / Acute effects of weight training on glycaemia in type 1 diabetes. In: Practical Diabetes International. 2012 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 155–159.
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    abstract = "Exercise is regarded as a potential strategy to assist in the management of blood glucose in people with type 1 diabetes. However, currently there is little evidence‐based information detailing the acute effects weight training has on glycaemia in type 1 diabetes. The aim of this review is to identify studies investigating the acute effects of weight training on blood glucose levels in type 1 diabetes.A search of Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane, Medline and SPORTDiscus databases was conducted. A systematic review of these studies was undertaken to address the issue.After fulfilling the inclusion criteria, eight articles were retrieved. The individual studies reported comparatively different results.Study findings from this review are inconclusive regarding the acute glycaemic response to weight training exercise. Analyses of the intervention studies highlight that weight training may increase, minimally affect or decrease post‐exercise glycaemia in type 1 diabetes. It is likely that the heterogeneity regarding the weight training methods used among the studies, as well as the pre/post‐exercise insulin and carbohydrate intake of the study participants have impacted on the findings.There remains a gap in the evidence base to inform health care professionals of the likely acute glycaemic response to weight training exercise. Problems in managing patient glycaemia may arise due to erroneous insulin and carbohydrate alterations based on unfounded and anecdotal‐based guidance. The studies highlighted in this review have reported some of the potential effects that weight training may have on glycaemia.",
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    Acute effects of weight training on glycaemia in type 1 diabetes. / Chisholm, John; Kilbride, Lynn; Charlton, Jacqui; McKnight, John A. .

    In: Practical Diabetes International, Vol. 29, No. 4, 01.05.2012, p. 155–159.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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