Corticosteroids for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis)

Rodrigo A. Salinas, Gonzalo Alvarez, Fergus Daly, Joaquim Ferreira

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    107 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background

    Inflammation and oedema of the facial nerve are implicated in causing Bell's palsy. Corticosteroids have a potent anti-inflammatory action which should minimise nerve damage.

    Objectives

    The objective of this review was to assess the effect of corticosteroid therapy in Bell's palsy.

    Search strategy

    We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Specialized Register (9 December 2008) for randomised trials, as well asMEDLINE (January 1966 to December 2008), EMBASE (January 1980 to December 2008) and LILACS (9 December 2008). We contacted known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished trials.

    Selection criteria

    Randomised trials comparing different routes of administration and dosage schemes of corticosteroid or adrenocorticotrophic hormone therapy versus a control group where no therapy considered effective for this condition was administered, unless it was also given in a similar way to the experimental group.

    Data collection and analysis

    Two authors independently assessed eligibility, trial quality, and extracted the data.

    Main results

    Eight trials with a total of 1569 participants were included. Allocation concealment was appropriate in six trials, and the data reported allowed an intention-to-treat analysis in four, while unpublished data from the fifth and sixth trials were provided by the authors. The data included in the main outcome of this meta-analysis were collected from seven trials with a total of 1507 participants. Overall 175/754 (23%) of the participants allocated to corticosteroids had incomplete recovery of facial motor function six months or more after randomisation, significantly less than 245/753 (33%) in the control group (risk ratio (RR) 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61 to 0.83). There was, also, a significant reduction in motor synkinesis during follow-up in those receiving corticosteroids (RR 0.6, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.81). The reduction in the proportion of patients with cosmetically disabling sequelae six months after randomisation, however, was not significant (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.44 to 2.15). The trial not included in the primary outcome of this meta-analysis showed a non-significant difference in outcomes between the arms.

    Authors' conclusions

    The available evidence from randomised controlled trials shows significant benefit from treating Bell's palsy with corticosteroids.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberCD001942
    Pages (from-to)-
    Number of pages26
    JournalCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Cite this

    Salinas, Rodrigo A. ; Alvarez, Gonzalo ; Daly, Fergus ; Ferreira, Joaquim. / Corticosteroids for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis). In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2010 ; No. 3. pp. -.
    @article{1dc89e3efb644b64ac260c2af96c6fdb,
    title = "Corticosteroids for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis)",
    abstract = "BackgroundInflammation and oedema of the facial nerve are implicated in causing Bell's palsy. Corticosteroids have a potent anti-inflammatory action which should minimise nerve damage.ObjectivesThe objective of this review was to assess the effect of corticosteroid therapy in Bell's palsy.Search strategyWe searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Specialized Register (9 December 2008) for randomised trials, as well asMEDLINE (January 1966 to December 2008), EMBASE (January 1980 to December 2008) and LILACS (9 December 2008). We contacted known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished trials.Selection criteriaRandomised trials comparing different routes of administration and dosage schemes of corticosteroid or adrenocorticotrophic hormone therapy versus a control group where no therapy considered effective for this condition was administered, unless it was also given in a similar way to the experimental group.Data collection and analysisTwo authors independently assessed eligibility, trial quality, and extracted the data.Main resultsEight trials with a total of 1569 participants were included. Allocation concealment was appropriate in six trials, and the data reported allowed an intention-to-treat analysis in four, while unpublished data from the fifth and sixth trials were provided by the authors. The data included in the main outcome of this meta-analysis were collected from seven trials with a total of 1507 participants. Overall 175/754 (23{\%}) of the participants allocated to corticosteroids had incomplete recovery of facial motor function six months or more after randomisation, significantly less than 245/753 (33{\%}) in the control group (risk ratio (RR) 0.71, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 0.61 to 0.83). There was, also, a significant reduction in motor synkinesis during follow-up in those receiving corticosteroids (RR 0.6, 95{\%} CI 0.44 to 0.81). The reduction in the proportion of patients with cosmetically disabling sequelae six months after randomisation, however, was not significant (RR 0.97, 95{\%} CI 0.44 to 2.15). The trial not included in the primary outcome of this meta-analysis showed a non-significant difference in outcomes between the arms.Authors' conclusionsThe available evidence from randomised controlled trials shows significant benefit from treating Bell's palsy with corticosteroids.",
    author = "Salinas, {Rodrigo A.} and Gonzalo Alvarez and Fergus Daly and Joaquim Ferreira",
    year = "2010",
    doi = "10.1002/14651858.CD001942.pub4",
    language = "English",
    pages = "--",
    journal = "Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews",
    issn = "1469-493X",
    publisher = "John Wiley & Sons Inc.",
    number = "3",

    }

    Corticosteroids for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis). / Salinas, Rodrigo A.; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Daly, Fergus; Ferreira, Joaquim.

    In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, No. 3, CD001942, 2010, p. -.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Corticosteroids for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis)

    AU - Salinas, Rodrigo A.

    AU - Alvarez, Gonzalo

    AU - Daly, Fergus

    AU - Ferreira, Joaquim

    PY - 2010

    Y1 - 2010

    N2 - BackgroundInflammation and oedema of the facial nerve are implicated in causing Bell's palsy. Corticosteroids have a potent anti-inflammatory action which should minimise nerve damage.ObjectivesThe objective of this review was to assess the effect of corticosteroid therapy in Bell's palsy.Search strategyWe searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Specialized Register (9 December 2008) for randomised trials, as well asMEDLINE (January 1966 to December 2008), EMBASE (January 1980 to December 2008) and LILACS (9 December 2008). We contacted known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished trials.Selection criteriaRandomised trials comparing different routes of administration and dosage schemes of corticosteroid or adrenocorticotrophic hormone therapy versus a control group where no therapy considered effective for this condition was administered, unless it was also given in a similar way to the experimental group.Data collection and analysisTwo authors independently assessed eligibility, trial quality, and extracted the data.Main resultsEight trials with a total of 1569 participants were included. Allocation concealment was appropriate in six trials, and the data reported allowed an intention-to-treat analysis in four, while unpublished data from the fifth and sixth trials were provided by the authors. The data included in the main outcome of this meta-analysis were collected from seven trials with a total of 1507 participants. Overall 175/754 (23%) of the participants allocated to corticosteroids had incomplete recovery of facial motor function six months or more after randomisation, significantly less than 245/753 (33%) in the control group (risk ratio (RR) 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61 to 0.83). There was, also, a significant reduction in motor synkinesis during follow-up in those receiving corticosteroids (RR 0.6, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.81). The reduction in the proportion of patients with cosmetically disabling sequelae six months after randomisation, however, was not significant (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.44 to 2.15). The trial not included in the primary outcome of this meta-analysis showed a non-significant difference in outcomes between the arms.Authors' conclusionsThe available evidence from randomised controlled trials shows significant benefit from treating Bell's palsy with corticosteroids.

    AB - BackgroundInflammation and oedema of the facial nerve are implicated in causing Bell's palsy. Corticosteroids have a potent anti-inflammatory action which should minimise nerve damage.ObjectivesThe objective of this review was to assess the effect of corticosteroid therapy in Bell's palsy.Search strategyWe searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Specialized Register (9 December 2008) for randomised trials, as well asMEDLINE (January 1966 to December 2008), EMBASE (January 1980 to December 2008) and LILACS (9 December 2008). We contacted known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished trials.Selection criteriaRandomised trials comparing different routes of administration and dosage schemes of corticosteroid or adrenocorticotrophic hormone therapy versus a control group where no therapy considered effective for this condition was administered, unless it was also given in a similar way to the experimental group.Data collection and analysisTwo authors independently assessed eligibility, trial quality, and extracted the data.Main resultsEight trials with a total of 1569 participants were included. Allocation concealment was appropriate in six trials, and the data reported allowed an intention-to-treat analysis in four, while unpublished data from the fifth and sixth trials were provided by the authors. The data included in the main outcome of this meta-analysis were collected from seven trials with a total of 1507 participants. Overall 175/754 (23%) of the participants allocated to corticosteroids had incomplete recovery of facial motor function six months or more after randomisation, significantly less than 245/753 (33%) in the control group (risk ratio (RR) 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61 to 0.83). There was, also, a significant reduction in motor synkinesis during follow-up in those receiving corticosteroids (RR 0.6, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.81). The reduction in the proportion of patients with cosmetically disabling sequelae six months after randomisation, however, was not significant (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.44 to 2.15). The trial not included in the primary outcome of this meta-analysis showed a non-significant difference in outcomes between the arms.Authors' conclusionsThe available evidence from randomised controlled trials shows significant benefit from treating Bell's palsy with corticosteroids.

    U2 - 10.1002/14651858.CD001942.pub4

    DO - 10.1002/14651858.CD001942.pub4

    M3 - Review article

    SP - -

    JO - Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

    JF - Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

    SN - 1469-493X

    IS - 3

    M1 - CD001942

    ER -