Dental discomfort questionnaire: its use with children with a learning disability

Judith Versloot, Emma Hall-Scullin, Jaap S.J. Veerkamp, Ruth Freeman

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    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study investigated whether the behaviors from the Dental Discomfort Questionnaire (DDQ) could help identify toothaches in children with a learning disability, who have a limited capacity to self-report. The objectives were to examine whether the behaviors from the DDQ occur more often in children with a learning disability who have caries and a toothache than in children who do not have caries and a toothache; and secondly, to examine whether two additional items increase the specificity and sensitivity of the DDQ to recognize a toothache, in this particular population of children with a learning disability. The DDQ was completed by a convenience sample of 58 parents on behalf of their children: 31% girls, aged between 6 and 13 years (mean = 7.5, SD = 2.7). Of the total group, 26% (n = 15) suffered from a toothache and 43% (n = 25) had carious teeth. Children with caries and a toothache had a significantly higher mean DDQ score and displayed more toothache-related behaviors (e.g., problems with chewing, problems with brushing teeth) than children without caries or toothache. The DDQ seems to be a functional and easy-to-use instrument to alert parents to the presence of a toothache in this specific group of children with a learning disability.

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    Toothache
    Learning Disorders
    Tooth
    Parents
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Mastication
    Self Report

    Cite this

    @article{cdaf632de0e640abbeb1a487cb334047,
    title = "Dental discomfort questionnaire: its use with children with a learning disability",
    abstract = "This study investigated whether the behaviors from the Dental Discomfort Questionnaire (DDQ) could help identify toothaches in children with a learning disability, who have a limited capacity to self-report. The objectives were to examine whether the behaviors from the DDQ occur more often in children with a learning disability who have caries and a toothache than in children who do not have caries and a toothache; and secondly, to examine whether two additional items increase the specificity and sensitivity of the DDQ to recognize a toothache, in this particular population of children with a learning disability. The DDQ was completed by a convenience sample of 58 parents on behalf of their children: 31{\%} girls, aged between 6 and 13 years (mean = 7.5, SD = 2.7). Of the total group, 26{\%} (n = 15) suffered from a toothache and 43{\%} (n = 25) had carious teeth. Children with caries and a toothache had a significantly higher mean DDQ score and displayed more toothache-related behaviors (e.g., problems with chewing, problems with brushing teeth) than children without caries or toothache. The DDQ seems to be a functional and easy-to-use instrument to alert parents to the presence of a toothache in this specific group of children with a learning disability.",
    author = "Judith Versloot and Emma Hall-Scullin and Veerkamp, {Jaap S.J.} and Ruth Freeman",
    year = "2008",
    doi = "10.1111/j.1754-4505.2008.00032.x",
    language = "English",
    volume = "28",
    pages = "140--4",
    journal = "Special Care in Dentistry: Official Publication of the American Association of Hospital Dentists, the Academy of Dentistry for the Handicapped, and the American Society for Geriatric Dentistry",
    issn = "0275-1879",
    publisher = "Wiley",
    number = "4",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Dental discomfort questionnaire

    T2 - its use with children with a learning disability

    AU - Versloot, Judith

    AU - Hall-Scullin, Emma

    AU - Veerkamp, Jaap S.J.

    AU - Freeman, Ruth

    PY - 2008

    Y1 - 2008

    N2 - This study investigated whether the behaviors from the Dental Discomfort Questionnaire (DDQ) could help identify toothaches in children with a learning disability, who have a limited capacity to self-report. The objectives were to examine whether the behaviors from the DDQ occur more often in children with a learning disability who have caries and a toothache than in children who do not have caries and a toothache; and secondly, to examine whether two additional items increase the specificity and sensitivity of the DDQ to recognize a toothache, in this particular population of children with a learning disability. The DDQ was completed by a convenience sample of 58 parents on behalf of their children: 31% girls, aged between 6 and 13 years (mean = 7.5, SD = 2.7). Of the total group, 26% (n = 15) suffered from a toothache and 43% (n = 25) had carious teeth. Children with caries and a toothache had a significantly higher mean DDQ score and displayed more toothache-related behaviors (e.g., problems with chewing, problems with brushing teeth) than children without caries or toothache. The DDQ seems to be a functional and easy-to-use instrument to alert parents to the presence of a toothache in this specific group of children with a learning disability.

    AB - This study investigated whether the behaviors from the Dental Discomfort Questionnaire (DDQ) could help identify toothaches in children with a learning disability, who have a limited capacity to self-report. The objectives were to examine whether the behaviors from the DDQ occur more often in children with a learning disability who have caries and a toothache than in children who do not have caries and a toothache; and secondly, to examine whether two additional items increase the specificity and sensitivity of the DDQ to recognize a toothache, in this particular population of children with a learning disability. The DDQ was completed by a convenience sample of 58 parents on behalf of their children: 31% girls, aged between 6 and 13 years (mean = 7.5, SD = 2.7). Of the total group, 26% (n = 15) suffered from a toothache and 43% (n = 25) had carious teeth. Children with caries and a toothache had a significantly higher mean DDQ score and displayed more toothache-related behaviors (e.g., problems with chewing, problems with brushing teeth) than children without caries or toothache. The DDQ seems to be a functional and easy-to-use instrument to alert parents to the presence of a toothache in this specific group of children with a learning disability.

    U2 - 10.1111/j.1754-4505.2008.00032.x

    DO - 10.1111/j.1754-4505.2008.00032.x

    M3 - Article

    C2 - 18647374

    VL - 28

    SP - 140

    EP - 144

    JO - Special Care in Dentistry: Official Publication of the American Association of Hospital Dentists, the Academy of Dentistry for the Handicapped, and the American Society for Geriatric Dentistry

    JF - Special Care in Dentistry: Official Publication of the American Association of Hospital Dentists, the Academy of Dentistry for the Handicapped, and the American Society for Geriatric Dentistry

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    IS - 4

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