Development of symptom assessments utilising item response theory and computer-adaptive testing--a practical method based on a systematic review

Jochen Walker, Jan R Böhnke, Thomas Cerny, Florian Strasser

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    20 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Assessment of individual patients' distress is a cornerstone of clinical care for advanced cancer. Patients' ability to fill out lengthy questionnaires is compromised by many factors. Computer-adaptive tests (CAT) offer a promising approach to developing tailored instruments, that administer only items relevant to the individual patient. A systematic review of the literature about CATs in medical databases was conducted. Based on the results, a method for developing a CAT was designed that requires nine steps: (1) build an item pool; (2) administer the items to a predefined sample in a calibration study; (3) eliminate inappropriate items; (4) examine whether all items are influenced by a single dominant trait; (5) calibrate the items to the best-fitting item response theory (IRT) model; (6) evaluate items' parameter equivalence across subgroups; (7) build an item bank with the calibrated items; (8) develop the CAT; and (9) pilot test the developed CAT. CAT offers the chance to extend the usefulness of patient-reported outcome (PRO) measurements from clinical studies to daily clinical practice.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)47-67
    Number of pages21
    JournalCritical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology
    Volume73
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010

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    Symptom Assessment
    Calibration
    Databases
    Neoplasms

    Keywords

    • Calibration
    • Data Interpretation, Statistical
    • Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted
    • Humans
    • Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
    • Patient Participation
    • Software
    • Journal Article
    • Meta-Analysis
    • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    • Review

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Assessment of individual patients' distress is a cornerstone of clinical care for advanced cancer. Patients' ability to fill out lengthy questionnaires is compromised by many factors. Computer-adaptive tests (CAT) offer a promising approach to developing tailored instruments, that administer only items relevant to the individual patient. A systematic review of the literature about CATs in medical databases was conducted. Based on the results, a method for developing a CAT was designed that requires nine steps: (1) build an item pool; (2) administer the items to a predefined sample in a calibration study; (3) eliminate inappropriate items; (4) examine whether all items are influenced by a single dominant trait; (5) calibrate the items to the best-fitting item response theory (IRT) model; (6) evaluate items' parameter equivalence across subgroups; (7) build an item bank with the calibrated items; (8) develop the CAT; and (9) pilot test the developed CAT. CAT offers the chance to extend the usefulness of patient-reported outcome (PRO) measurements from clinical studies to daily clinical practice.",
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    Development of symptom assessments utilising item response theory and computer-adaptive testing--a practical method based on a systematic review. / Walker, Jochen; Böhnke, Jan R; Cerny, Thomas; Strasser, Florian.

    In: Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology, Vol. 73, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 47-67.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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