Drawing on “Producer-Tours”: A Technique for Addressing Consumer Uncertainty Surrounding the Consumption of Fair Trade Food Products?

Bob Doherty, Daniel Wade Clarke

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Despite the global increase in both fair trade sales and awareness, actual market shares of some fair trade products remain disappointing. A number of authors have suggested various reasons for this, including the complexity of the situational context affecting actual purchase behavior (Carrington, Neville, & Whitwell, 2010), the disconnect between producers and consumers (Dickinson, 2001), and the problems associated with the depersonalization of ethics in mainstream distribution (Bezencon & Blili, 2011). This article introduces the drawing method into the field of research on fair trade consumption. Using this method, this study explores student perceptions of both fair trade consumers and how fair trade works. In doing so, the drawing method unveiled two potential consumer types; namely, the dreamer and the angel. On this, we argue that our study reveals some of the possibilities inherent in the use of the drawing method to explore uncertainty surrounding fair trade consumption.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)296-320
    JournalJournal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing
    Volume24
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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    Fair trade
    Uncertainty
    Food products
    Purchase behavior
    Market share
    Student perceptions

    Cite this

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    title = "Drawing on “Producer-Tours”:: A Technique for Addressing Consumer Uncertainty Surrounding the Consumption of Fair Trade Food Products?",
    abstract = "Despite the global increase in both fair trade sales and awareness, actual market shares of some fair trade products remain disappointing. A number of authors have suggested various reasons for this, including the complexity of the situational context affecting actual purchase behavior (Carrington, Neville, & Whitwell, 2010), the disconnect between producers and consumers (Dickinson, 2001), and the problems associated with the depersonalization of ethics in mainstream distribution (Bezencon & Blili, 2011). This article introduces the drawing method into the field of research on fair trade consumption. Using this method, this study explores student perceptions of both fair trade consumers and how fair trade works. In doing so, the drawing method unveiled two potential consumer types; namely, the dreamer and the angel. On this, we argue that our study reveals some of the possibilities inherent in the use of the drawing method to explore uncertainty surrounding fair trade consumption.",
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