Environmental and social benefits of the targeted intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer: Data from UK TARGIT-A trial centres and two UK NHS hospitals offering TARGIT IORT

Nathan J. Coombs, Joel M. Coombs, Uma J. Vaidya, Julian Singer, Max Bulsara, Jeffrey S. Tobias, Frederik Wenz, David J. Joseph, Douglas A. Brown, Richard Rainsbury, Tim Davidson, Douglas J A Adamson, Samuele Massarut, David Morgan, Ingrid Potyka, Tammy Corica, Mary Falzon, Norman Williams, Michael Baum, Jayant S. Vaidya (Lead / Corresponding author)

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    Abstract

    Objective: To quantify the journeys and CO2 emissions if women with breast cancer are treated with risk-adapted single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) rather than several weeks' course of external beam whole breast radiotherapy (EBRT) treatment. Setting: (1) TARGIT-A randomised clinical trial (ISRCTN34086741) which compared TARGIT with traditional EBRT and found similar breast cancer control, particularly when TARGIT was given simultaneously with lumpectomy, (2) 2 additional UK centres offering TARGIT. Participants: 485 UK patients (249 TARGIT, 236 EBRT) in the prepathology stratum of TARGIT-A trial (where randomisation occurred before lumpectomy and TARGIT was delivered simultaneously with lumpectomy) for whom geographical data were available and 22 patients treated with TARGIT after completion of the TARGIT-A trial in 2 additional UK breast centres. Outcome measures: The shortest total journey distance, time and CO2 emissions from home to hospital to receive all the fractions of radiotherapy. Methods: Distances, time and CO2 emissions were calculated using Google Maps and assuming a fuel efficiency of 40 mpg. The groups were compared using the Student t test with unequal variance and the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test. Results: TARGIT patients travelled significantly fewer miles: TARGIT 21 681, mean 87.1 (SE 19.1) versus EBRT 92 591, mean 392.3 (SE 30.2); had lower CO2 emissions 24.7 kg (SE 5.4) vs 111 kg (SE 8.6) and spent less time travelling: 3 h (SE 0.53) vs 14 h (SE 0.76), all p2 per patient). Conclusions: The use of TARGIT intraoperative radiotherapy for eligible patients with breast cancer significantly reduces their journeys for treatment and has environmental benefits. If widely available, 5 million miles (8 000 000 km) of travel, 170 000 woman-hours and 1200 tonnes of CO2 (a forest of 100 hectares) will be saved annually in the UK. Trial registration number: ISRCTN34086741; Post-results.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere010703
    JournalBMJ Open
    Volume6
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 9 May 2016

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    Radiotherapy
    Breast Neoplasms
    Breast
    Segmental Mastectomy
    Random Allocation
    Randomized Controlled Trials

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    Coombs, Nathan J. ; Coombs, Joel M. ; Vaidya, Uma J. ; Singer, Julian ; Bulsara, Max ; Tobias, Jeffrey S. ; Wenz, Frederik ; Joseph, David J. ; Brown, Douglas A. ; Rainsbury, Richard ; Davidson, Tim ; Adamson, Douglas J A ; Massarut, Samuele ; Morgan, David ; Potyka, Ingrid ; Corica, Tammy ; Falzon, Mary ; Williams, Norman ; Baum, Michael ; Vaidya, Jayant S. / Environmental and social benefits of the targeted intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer : Data from UK TARGIT-A trial centres and two UK NHS hospitals offering TARGIT IORT. In: BMJ Open. 2016 ; Vol. 6, No. 5.
    @article{ac71e4e8be0b4bae9937b456cdc5e062,
    title = "Environmental and social benefits of the targeted intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer: Data from UK TARGIT-A trial centres and two UK NHS hospitals offering TARGIT IORT",
    abstract = "Objective: To quantify the journeys and CO2 emissions if women with breast cancer are treated with risk-adapted single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) rather than several weeks' course of external beam whole breast radiotherapy (EBRT) treatment. Setting: (1) TARGIT-A randomised clinical trial (ISRCTN34086741) which compared TARGIT with traditional EBRT and found similar breast cancer control, particularly when TARGIT was given simultaneously with lumpectomy, (2) 2 additional UK centres offering TARGIT. Participants: 485 UK patients (249 TARGIT, 236 EBRT) in the prepathology stratum of TARGIT-A trial (where randomisation occurred before lumpectomy and TARGIT was delivered simultaneously with lumpectomy) for whom geographical data were available and 22 patients treated with TARGIT after completion of the TARGIT-A trial in 2 additional UK breast centres. Outcome measures: The shortest total journey distance, time and CO2 emissions from home to hospital to receive all the fractions of radiotherapy. Methods: Distances, time and CO2 emissions were calculated using Google Maps and assuming a fuel efficiency of 40 mpg. The groups were compared using the Student t test with unequal variance and the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test. Results: TARGIT patients travelled significantly fewer miles: TARGIT 21 681, mean 87.1 (SE 19.1) versus EBRT 92 591, mean 392.3 (SE 30.2); had lower CO2 emissions 24.7 kg (SE 5.4) vs 111 kg (SE 8.6) and spent less time travelling: 3 h (SE 0.53) vs 14 h (SE 0.76), all p2 per patient). Conclusions: The use of TARGIT intraoperative radiotherapy for eligible patients with breast cancer significantly reduces their journeys for treatment and has environmental benefits. If widely available, 5 million miles (8 000 000 km) of travel, 170 000 woman-hours and 1200 tonnes of CO2 (a forest of 100 hectares) will be saved annually in the UK. Trial registration number: ISRCTN34086741; Post-results.",
    author = "Coombs, {Nathan J.} and Coombs, {Joel M.} and Vaidya, {Uma J.} and Julian Singer and Max Bulsara and Tobias, {Jeffrey S.} and Frederik Wenz and Joseph, {David J.} and Brown, {Douglas A.} and Richard Rainsbury and Tim Davidson and Adamson, {Douglas J A} and Samuele Massarut and David Morgan and Ingrid Potyka and Tammy Corica and Mary Falzon and Norman Williams and Michael Baum and Vaidya, {Jayant S.}",
    year = "2016",
    month = "5",
    day = "9",
    doi = "10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010703",
    language = "English",
    volume = "6",
    journal = "BMJ Open",
    issn = "2044-6055",
    publisher = "BMJ Journals",
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    }

    Coombs, NJ, Coombs, JM, Vaidya, UJ, Singer, J, Bulsara, M, Tobias, JS, Wenz, F, Joseph, DJ, Brown, DA, Rainsbury, R, Davidson, T, Adamson, DJA, Massarut, S, Morgan, D, Potyka, I, Corica, T, Falzon, M, Williams, N, Baum, M & Vaidya, JS 2016, 'Environmental and social benefits of the targeted intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer: Data from UK TARGIT-A trial centres and two UK NHS hospitals offering TARGIT IORT', BMJ Open, vol. 6, no. 5, e010703. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010703

    Environmental and social benefits of the targeted intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer : Data from UK TARGIT-A trial centres and two UK NHS hospitals offering TARGIT IORT. / Coombs, Nathan J.; Coombs, Joel M.; Vaidya, Uma J.; Singer, Julian; Bulsara, Max; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Joseph, David J.; Brown, Douglas A.; Rainsbury, Richard; Davidson, Tim; Adamson, Douglas J A; Massarut, Samuele; Morgan, David; Potyka, Ingrid; Corica, Tammy; Falzon, Mary; Williams, Norman; Baum, Michael; Vaidya, Jayant S. (Lead / Corresponding author).

    In: BMJ Open, Vol. 6, No. 5, e010703, 09.05.2016.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Environmental and social benefits of the targeted intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    T2 - Data from UK TARGIT-A trial centres and two UK NHS hospitals offering TARGIT IORT

    AU - Coombs, Nathan J.

    AU - Coombs, Joel M.

    AU - Vaidya, Uma J.

    AU - Singer, Julian

    AU - Bulsara, Max

    AU - Tobias, Jeffrey S.

    AU - Wenz, Frederik

    AU - Joseph, David J.

    AU - Brown, Douglas A.

    AU - Rainsbury, Richard

    AU - Davidson, Tim

    AU - Adamson, Douglas J A

    AU - Massarut, Samuele

    AU - Morgan, David

    AU - Potyka, Ingrid

    AU - Corica, Tammy

    AU - Falzon, Mary

    AU - Williams, Norman

    AU - Baum, Michael

    AU - Vaidya, Jayant S.

    PY - 2016/5/9

    Y1 - 2016/5/9

    N2 - Objective: To quantify the journeys and CO2 emissions if women with breast cancer are treated with risk-adapted single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) rather than several weeks' course of external beam whole breast radiotherapy (EBRT) treatment. Setting: (1) TARGIT-A randomised clinical trial (ISRCTN34086741) which compared TARGIT with traditional EBRT and found similar breast cancer control, particularly when TARGIT was given simultaneously with lumpectomy, (2) 2 additional UK centres offering TARGIT. Participants: 485 UK patients (249 TARGIT, 236 EBRT) in the prepathology stratum of TARGIT-A trial (where randomisation occurred before lumpectomy and TARGIT was delivered simultaneously with lumpectomy) for whom geographical data were available and 22 patients treated with TARGIT after completion of the TARGIT-A trial in 2 additional UK breast centres. Outcome measures: The shortest total journey distance, time and CO2 emissions from home to hospital to receive all the fractions of radiotherapy. Methods: Distances, time and CO2 emissions were calculated using Google Maps and assuming a fuel efficiency of 40 mpg. The groups were compared using the Student t test with unequal variance and the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test. Results: TARGIT patients travelled significantly fewer miles: TARGIT 21 681, mean 87.1 (SE 19.1) versus EBRT 92 591, mean 392.3 (SE 30.2); had lower CO2 emissions 24.7 kg (SE 5.4) vs 111 kg (SE 8.6) and spent less time travelling: 3 h (SE 0.53) vs 14 h (SE 0.76), all p2 per patient). Conclusions: The use of TARGIT intraoperative radiotherapy for eligible patients with breast cancer significantly reduces their journeys for treatment and has environmental benefits. If widely available, 5 million miles (8 000 000 km) of travel, 170 000 woman-hours and 1200 tonnes of CO2 (a forest of 100 hectares) will be saved annually in the UK. Trial registration number: ISRCTN34086741; Post-results.

    AB - Objective: To quantify the journeys and CO2 emissions if women with breast cancer are treated with risk-adapted single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) rather than several weeks' course of external beam whole breast radiotherapy (EBRT) treatment. Setting: (1) TARGIT-A randomised clinical trial (ISRCTN34086741) which compared TARGIT with traditional EBRT and found similar breast cancer control, particularly when TARGIT was given simultaneously with lumpectomy, (2) 2 additional UK centres offering TARGIT. Participants: 485 UK patients (249 TARGIT, 236 EBRT) in the prepathology stratum of TARGIT-A trial (where randomisation occurred before lumpectomy and TARGIT was delivered simultaneously with lumpectomy) for whom geographical data were available and 22 patients treated with TARGIT after completion of the TARGIT-A trial in 2 additional UK breast centres. Outcome measures: The shortest total journey distance, time and CO2 emissions from home to hospital to receive all the fractions of radiotherapy. Methods: Distances, time and CO2 emissions were calculated using Google Maps and assuming a fuel efficiency of 40 mpg. The groups were compared using the Student t test with unequal variance and the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test. Results: TARGIT patients travelled significantly fewer miles: TARGIT 21 681, mean 87.1 (SE 19.1) versus EBRT 92 591, mean 392.3 (SE 30.2); had lower CO2 emissions 24.7 kg (SE 5.4) vs 111 kg (SE 8.6) and spent less time travelling: 3 h (SE 0.53) vs 14 h (SE 0.76), all p2 per patient). Conclusions: The use of TARGIT intraoperative radiotherapy for eligible patients with breast cancer significantly reduces their journeys for treatment and has environmental benefits. If widely available, 5 million miles (8 000 000 km) of travel, 170 000 woman-hours and 1200 tonnes of CO2 (a forest of 100 hectares) will be saved annually in the UK. Trial registration number: ISRCTN34086741; Post-results.

    U2 - 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010703

    DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010703

    M3 - Article

    C2 - 27160842

    AN - SCOPUS:84971282319

    VL - 6

    JO - BMJ Open

    JF - BMJ Open

    SN - 2044-6055

    IS - 5

    M1 - e010703

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