EU sanitary standards and Sub-Saharan African agricultural exports

a case study of the livestock sector in East Africa

Melaku Geboye Desta

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    For most sub-Saharan African countries, participation in international trade almost always means exporting primary, often agricultural, products and importing machinery and other manufacturing goods. In appreciation of the detrimental economic effects of this situation on SSA countries, the EU has had one of the oldest and most generous preferential schemes for the benefit of these countries. This article argues, based on detailed analysis of EU food import law and its application to livestock products coming from East Africa, that these otherwise generous preferential schemes have been deprived of any effect by the stringent sanitary and phytosanitary requirements that are beyond the capacity of the producers in these countries to satisfy. It further argues that the current approach of the WTO system regarding SPS issues, which leaves countries free to impose standards of their choosing without any regard for the impact of such measures on the lives of producers in other countries, only accords a convenient blanket with which to wrap measures otherwise motivated by protectionist interests. It concludes that the only way the EU or any other country could support the SSA agricultural sector and the large number of poor people working in it is by helping governments and producers to enhance their production standards.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)98-123
    Number of pages26
    JournalLaw and Development Review
    Volume1
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2008

    Fingerprint

    agricultural export
    East Africa
    livestock
    producer
    EU
    international trade
    machinery
    import
    manufacturing
    agricultural sector
    world trade
    WTO
    agricultural product
    food
    economics
    participation
    Law
    effect
    Agricultural exports
    Livestock

    Keywords

    • Economic development
    • agriculture
    • International trade
    • SPS requirements
    • trade preferences

    Cite this

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    abstract = "For most sub-Saharan African countries, participation in international trade almost always means exporting primary, often agricultural, products and importing machinery and other manufacturing goods. In appreciation of the detrimental economic effects of this situation on SSA countries, the EU has had one of the oldest and most generous preferential schemes for the benefit of these countries. This article argues, based on detailed analysis of EU food import law and its application to livestock products coming from East Africa, that these otherwise generous preferential schemes have been deprived of any effect by the stringent sanitary and phytosanitary requirements that are beyond the capacity of the producers in these countries to satisfy. It further argues that the current approach of the WTO system regarding SPS issues, which leaves countries free to impose standards of their choosing without any regard for the impact of such measures on the lives of producers in other countries, only accords a convenient blanket with which to wrap measures otherwise motivated by protectionist interests. It concludes that the only way the EU or any other country could support the SSA agricultural sector and the large number of poor people working in it is by helping governments and producers to enhance their production standards.",
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    EU sanitary standards and Sub-Saharan African agricultural exports : a case study of the livestock sector in East Africa. / Desta, Melaku Geboye.

    In: Law and Development Review, Vol. 1, No. 1, 12.2008, p. 98-123.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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