Fetal and perinatal consequences of maternal obesity

Chakrapani Vasudevan, Mary Renfrew, William McGuire

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    59 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In many industrialised countries, one in five women booking for antenatal care is obese. As well as affecting maternal health, maternal obesity may have important adverse consequences for fetal, neonatal and long-term health and well-being. Maternal obesity is associated with a higher risk of stillbirth, elective preterm birth and perinatal mortality. The incidence of severe birth defects, particularly neural tube and structural cardiac defects, appears to be higher in infants of obese mothers. Fetal macrosomia associated with maternal obesity and gestational diabetes predisposes infants to birth injuries, perinatal asphyxia and transitional problems such as neonatal respiratory distress and metabolic instability. Maternal obesity may also result in long-term health problems for offspring secondary to perinatal problems and to intrauterine and postnatal programming effects. Currently, the available interventions to prevent and treat maternal obesity are of limited proven utility and further research is needed to define the effects of maternal weight management interventions on fetal and neonatal outcomes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)F378-82
    Number of pages5
    JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal edition
    Volume96
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

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    Obesity
    Mothers
    Fetal Macrosomia
    Birth Injuries
    Neural Tube
    Prenatal Care
    Stillbirth
    Gestational Diabetes
    Perinatal Mortality
    Asphyxia
    Premature Birth
    Health
    Developed Countries
    Weights and Measures
    Incidence
    Research

    Cite this

    Vasudevan, Chakrapani ; Renfrew, Mary ; McGuire, William. / Fetal and perinatal consequences of maternal obesity. In: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal edition. 2011 ; Vol. 96, No. 5. pp. F378-82.
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    Fetal and perinatal consequences of maternal obesity. / Vasudevan, Chakrapani; Renfrew, Mary; McGuire, William.

    In: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal edition, Vol. 96, No. 5, 2011, p. F378-82.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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