Gateways to Bletchley

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    Abstract

    Bletchley Park is a former country estate, with a large house in an undistinguished late Victorian style. During its time as the Headquarters of UK cryptanalysis efforts in WW2, its grounds began to fill with huts, followed by massive information processing blocks. In the postwar era, elements of the intelligence services remained until much of it became a telecommunications training school.
    It can be seen as an underacknowledged cauldron of information processing experimentation, a cinematic cypher, and a prism through which we can view British senses of wartime, class, transatlantic power, stunted modernity, the military roots of the information age, and relations to ruin and redevelopment.
    The artists contributions to Cultural Politics are always Open Access but they would naturally prefer access through their own portal at http://culturalpolitics.dukejournals.org/content/10/2/151.full

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)151-162
    Number of pages12
    JournalCultural Politics
    Volume10
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

    Fingerprint

    information processing
    secret service
    redevelopment
    open access
    Prisms
    telecommunication
    artist
    Telecommunication
    modernity
    Military
    politics
    school
    Information Processing
    time
    Second World War
    Open Access
    Ruin
    Post-war Era
    Late-Victorian
    Wartime

    Keywords

    • 'Bletchely Park'
    • cryptography
    • future war monuments
    • cyber warfare
    • Colossus
    • Enigma
    • history of technology
    • 'photo essay'
    • 'film studies'

    Cite this

    Dunlop, Gair. / Gateways to Bletchley. In: Cultural Politics. 2014 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 151-162.
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    abstract = "Bletchley Park is a former country estate, with a large house in an undistinguished late Victorian style. During its time as the Headquarters of UK cryptanalysis efforts in WW2, its grounds began to fill with huts, followed by massive information processing blocks. In the postwar era, elements of the intelligence services remained until much of it became a telecommunications training school. It can be seen as an underacknowledged cauldron of information processing experimentation, a cinematic cypher, and a prism through which we can view British senses of wartime, class, transatlantic power, stunted modernity, the military roots of the information age, and relations to ruin and redevelopment. The artists contributions to Cultural Politics are always Open Access but they would naturally prefer access through their own portal at http://culturalpolitics.dukejournals.org/content/10/2/151.full",
    keywords = "'Bletchely Park', cryptography, future war monuments , cyber warfare, Colossus, Enigma, history of technology, 'photo essay', 'film studies'",
    author = "Gair Dunlop",
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    }

    Dunlop, G 2014, 'Gateways to Bletchley', Cultural Politics, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 151-162.

    Gateways to Bletchley. / Dunlop, Gair.

    In: Cultural Politics, Vol. 10, No. 2, 07.2014, p. 151-162.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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