Group work with multimedia in mathematics: contrasting patterns of interaction

Brian Hudson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper outlines the use of the UK National Curriculum Council sponsored multimedia package World of Number with a Year 9 mathematics class. The classroom research was conducted in a South Yorkshire comprehensive school during the Spring term of 1994. The class worked on graphs of relationships between distance, speed and time. The resulting activity is illustrated through examples of the discourse from some of the groups working on the multimedia-based activities. Despite initial impressions of effective collaboration contrasting patterns of interaction are highlighted, with some examples of rich interaction about the problem in several cases but also with examples of much lower levels of engagement with the problem in others.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)171-190
    Number of pages20
    JournalBritish Journal of Educational Technology
    Volume27
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 1996

    Cite this

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    Group work with multimedia in mathematics : contrasting patterns of interaction. / Hudson, Brian.

    In: British Journal of Educational Technology, Vol. 27, No. 3, 09.1996, p. 171-190.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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