Is alcohol consumption related to likelihood of reporting chronic widespread pain in people with stable consumption?

Results from UK biobank

Marcus J Beasley, Tatiana V Macfarlane, Gary J Macfarlane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies have suggested that alcohol consumption is strongly related to reduced reporting of chronic widespread pain (CWP) and level of disability in people with CWP or fibromyalgia. Direction of causality has not been established, that is whether the association is due to people's health influencing their alcohol consumption or vice versa. UK Biobank recruited over 500,000 people aged 40 to 69 years, registered at medical practices nationwide. Participants provided detailed information on health and lifestyle factors including pain and alcohol consumption. Total units consumed per week were calculated for current drinkers. Information was also collected on changes in alcohol consumption and reasons for such changes. Analysis was performed with logistic regression expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals, then adjusted for a large number of potential confounding factors (adjORs). In males who reported drinking the same as 10 years previously, there was a U-shaped relationship between amount drunk and odds of reporting CWP (nondrinkers CWP prevalence 2.4%, 19.1-32.1 units/wk 0.4%, >53.6 units/wk 1.0%; adjORs 2.53 95% confidence intervals [1.78-3.60] vs 1 vs 1.52 [1.05-2.20]). In females, there was a decrease in the proportion reporting CWP up to the modal category of alcohol consumption with no further change in those drinking more (nondrinkers CWP prevalence 3.4%, 6.4-11.2 units/wk 0.7%, >32.1 units/wk 0.7%; adjORs 2.11 [1.67-2.66] vs 1 vs 0.86 [0.54-1.39]). This large study has shown a clear relationship between alcohol consumption and reporting of pain even in people who had not reported changing consumption because of health concerns, after adjustment for potential confounding factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2552-2560
Number of pages9
JournalPain
Volume157
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2016

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Chronic Pain
Alcohol Drinking
Drinking
Health
Confidence Intervals
Pain
Fibromyalgia
Disabled Persons
Causality
Life Style
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio

Cite this

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title = "Is alcohol consumption related to likelihood of reporting chronic widespread pain in people with stable consumption?: Results from UK biobank",
abstract = "Studies have suggested that alcohol consumption is strongly related to reduced reporting of chronic widespread pain (CWP) and level of disability in people with CWP or fibromyalgia. Direction of causality has not been established, that is whether the association is due to people's health influencing their alcohol consumption or vice versa. UK Biobank recruited over 500,000 people aged 40 to 69 years, registered at medical practices nationwide. Participants provided detailed information on health and lifestyle factors including pain and alcohol consumption. Total units consumed per week were calculated for current drinkers. Information was also collected on changes in alcohol consumption and reasons for such changes. Analysis was performed with logistic regression expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95{\%} confidence intervals, then adjusted for a large number of potential confounding factors (adjORs). In males who reported drinking the same as 10 years previously, there was a U-shaped relationship between amount drunk and odds of reporting CWP (nondrinkers CWP prevalence 2.4{\%}, 19.1-32.1 units/wk 0.4{\%}, >53.6 units/wk 1.0{\%}; adjORs 2.53 95{\%} confidence intervals [1.78-3.60] vs 1 vs 1.52 [1.05-2.20]). In females, there was a decrease in the proportion reporting CWP up to the modal category of alcohol consumption with no further change in those drinking more (nondrinkers CWP prevalence 3.4{\%}, 6.4-11.2 units/wk 0.7{\%}, >32.1 units/wk 0.7{\%}; adjORs 2.11 [1.67-2.66] vs 1 vs 0.86 [0.54-1.39]). This large study has shown a clear relationship between alcohol consumption and reporting of pain even in people who had not reported changing consumption because of health concerns, after adjustment for potential confounding factors.",
author = "Beasley, {Marcus J} and Macfarlane, {Tatiana V} and Macfarlane, {Gary J}",
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Is alcohol consumption related to likelihood of reporting chronic widespread pain in people with stable consumption? Results from UK biobank. / Beasley, Marcus J; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Macfarlane, Gary J.

In: Pain, Vol. 157, No. 11, 11.2016, p. 2552-2560.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is alcohol consumption related to likelihood of reporting chronic widespread pain in people with stable consumption?

T2 - Results from UK biobank

AU - Beasley, Marcus J

AU - Macfarlane, Tatiana V

AU - Macfarlane, Gary J

PY - 2016/11

Y1 - 2016/11

N2 - Studies have suggested that alcohol consumption is strongly related to reduced reporting of chronic widespread pain (CWP) and level of disability in people with CWP or fibromyalgia. Direction of causality has not been established, that is whether the association is due to people's health influencing their alcohol consumption or vice versa. UK Biobank recruited over 500,000 people aged 40 to 69 years, registered at medical practices nationwide. Participants provided detailed information on health and lifestyle factors including pain and alcohol consumption. Total units consumed per week were calculated for current drinkers. Information was also collected on changes in alcohol consumption and reasons for such changes. Analysis was performed with logistic regression expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals, then adjusted for a large number of potential confounding factors (adjORs). In males who reported drinking the same as 10 years previously, there was a U-shaped relationship between amount drunk and odds of reporting CWP (nondrinkers CWP prevalence 2.4%, 19.1-32.1 units/wk 0.4%, >53.6 units/wk 1.0%; adjORs 2.53 95% confidence intervals [1.78-3.60] vs 1 vs 1.52 [1.05-2.20]). In females, there was a decrease in the proportion reporting CWP up to the modal category of alcohol consumption with no further change in those drinking more (nondrinkers CWP prevalence 3.4%, 6.4-11.2 units/wk 0.7%, >32.1 units/wk 0.7%; adjORs 2.11 [1.67-2.66] vs 1 vs 0.86 [0.54-1.39]). This large study has shown a clear relationship between alcohol consumption and reporting of pain even in people who had not reported changing consumption because of health concerns, after adjustment for potential confounding factors.

AB - Studies have suggested that alcohol consumption is strongly related to reduced reporting of chronic widespread pain (CWP) and level of disability in people with CWP or fibromyalgia. Direction of causality has not been established, that is whether the association is due to people's health influencing their alcohol consumption or vice versa. UK Biobank recruited over 500,000 people aged 40 to 69 years, registered at medical practices nationwide. Participants provided detailed information on health and lifestyle factors including pain and alcohol consumption. Total units consumed per week were calculated for current drinkers. Information was also collected on changes in alcohol consumption and reasons for such changes. Analysis was performed with logistic regression expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals, then adjusted for a large number of potential confounding factors (adjORs). In males who reported drinking the same as 10 years previously, there was a U-shaped relationship between amount drunk and odds of reporting CWP (nondrinkers CWP prevalence 2.4%, 19.1-32.1 units/wk 0.4%, >53.6 units/wk 1.0%; adjORs 2.53 95% confidence intervals [1.78-3.60] vs 1 vs 1.52 [1.05-2.20]). In females, there was a decrease in the proportion reporting CWP up to the modal category of alcohol consumption with no further change in those drinking more (nondrinkers CWP prevalence 3.4%, 6.4-11.2 units/wk 0.7%, >32.1 units/wk 0.7%; adjORs 2.11 [1.67-2.66] vs 1 vs 0.86 [0.54-1.39]). This large study has shown a clear relationship between alcohol consumption and reporting of pain even in people who had not reported changing consumption because of health concerns, after adjustment for potential confounding factors.

U2 - 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000675

DO - 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000675

M3 - Article

VL - 157

SP - 2552

EP - 2560

JO - Pain

JF - Pain

SN - 0304-3959

IS - 11

ER -