Managing Chronic Pain in Primary Care

Blair H. Smith, Alexander J. Clark, Beverly Collett

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Chronic pain is an important primary care condition and only a minority of sufferers receive treatment in specialist pain clinics. It is important that primary healthcare professionals have an understanding of the multidimensional nature of chronic pain and its management, and that the process and outcomes of specialist referral are optimized. Although there is a general lack of evidence for managing pain in primary care, a reasonable approach may be adopted, supported by consensus and guidelines. Chronic pain should be assessed for potentially treatable causes, and associated biopsychosocial mediating factors using standard primary care approaches. Pharmacological treatments are useful, if used appropriately and in association with other approaches, and with regular follow-up and review. Referral within and beyond the primary care team is frequently advantageous, and there are many innovative strategies in practice or under development to maximise benefits. The primary care physician is therefore well placed to perform, facilitate and develop excellent chronic pain management.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationClinical Pain Management
Subtitle of host publicationA Practical Guide
EditorsMary E. Lynch, Kenneth D. Craig, Philip W. H. Peng
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Pages97-103
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)9781444330694
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Nov 2010

Fingerprint

Chronic Pain
Primary Health Care
Pain Management
Referral and Consultation
Pain Clinics
Primary Care Physicians
Consensus
Pharmacology
Guidelines
Pain
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Chronic pain
  • Guidelines
  • Non-pharmacological management
  • Pharmacological management
  • Primary care
  • Referral

Cite this

Smith, B. H., Clark, A. J., & Collett, B. (2010). Managing Chronic Pain in Primary Care. In M. E. Lynch, K. D. Craig, & P. W. H. Peng (Eds.), Clinical Pain Management: A Practical Guide (pp. 97-103). Wiley-Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781444329711.ch12
Smith, Blair H. ; Clark, Alexander J. ; Collett, Beverly. / Managing Chronic Pain in Primary Care. Clinical Pain Management: A Practical Guide. editor / Mary E. Lynch ; Kenneth D. Craig ; Philip W. H. Peng. Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. pp. 97-103
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Smith, BH, Clark, AJ & Collett, B 2010, Managing Chronic Pain in Primary Care. in ME Lynch, KD Craig & PWH Peng (eds), Clinical Pain Management: A Practical Guide. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 97-103. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781444329711.ch12

Managing Chronic Pain in Primary Care. / Smith, Blair H.; Clark, Alexander J.; Collett, Beverly.

Clinical Pain Management: A Practical Guide. ed. / Mary E. Lynch; Kenneth D. Craig; Philip W. H. Peng. Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. p. 97-103.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Smith BH, Clark AJ, Collett B. Managing Chronic Pain in Primary Care. In Lynch ME, Craig KD, Peng PWH, editors, Clinical Pain Management: A Practical Guide. Wiley-Blackwell. 2010. p. 97-103 https://doi.org/10.1002/9781444329711.ch12