Neurosteroid modulation of native and recombinant GABAA receptors

Jeremy J. Lambert, Delia Belelli, Claire Hill-Venning, Helen Callachan, John A. Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. The pioneering work of Hans Selye over 50 years ago demonstrated that certain steroid metabolites can produce a rapid depression of central nervous system activity. 2. Research during the last 10 years has established that such effects are mediated by a nongenomic and specific interaction of these steroids with the brain's major inhibitory receptor, the GABAA receptor. 3. Here we describe the molecular mechanism of action of such steroids and review attempts to define the steroid binding site on the receptor protein. The therapeutic potential of such neurosteroids is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-174
Number of pages20
JournalCellular and Molecular Neurobiology
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1996

Fingerprint

GABA-A Receptors
Neurotransmitter Agents
Steroids
Central Nervous System
Binding Sites
Brain
Research
Proteins
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Anesthetic
  • GABA receptor
  • Ligand-gated ion channel
  • Neurosteroids
  • Neurotransmitter receptor
  • Nongenomic steroid effects
  • Pregnane steroids
  • Whole-cell patch-clamp
  • Xenopus laevis oocyte

Cite this

Lambert, Jeremy J. ; Belelli, Delia ; Hill-Venning, Claire ; Callachan, Helen ; Peters, John A. / Neurosteroid modulation of native and recombinant GABAA receptors. In: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology. 1996 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 155-174.
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Neurosteroid modulation of native and recombinant GABAA receptors. / Lambert, Jeremy J.; Belelli, Delia; Hill-Venning, Claire; Callachan, Helen; Peters, John A.

In: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology, Vol. 16, No. 2, 04.1996, p. 155-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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