Tayside-Fife clinical trial of cognitive-behavioural therapy for medication-resistant psychotic symptoms: Results to 3-month follow-up

Robert C. Durham, Moyra Guthrie, R. Victor Morton, David A. Reid, Linda R. Treliving, David Fowler, Ranald R. MacDonald

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    Abstract

    Background Evidence for the efficacy of cognitive—behavioural therapy for schizophrenia is promising but evidence for clinical effectiveness is limited. Aims To test the effectiveness of cognitive—behavioural therapy delivered by clinical nurse specialists in routine practice. Method Of 274 referrals, 66 were allocated randomly to 9 months of treatment as usual (TAU), cognitive—behavioural therapy plus TAU (CBT) or supportive psychotherapy plus TAU (SPT) and followed up for 3 months. Results Treatment effects were modest but the CBT condition gave significantly greater improvement in overall symptom severity than the SPT or TAU conditions combined (F (1,53)=4.14; P=0.05). Both the CBT and SPT conditions combined gave significantly greater improvement in severity of delusions than did the TAU condition (F (1,53)=4.83; P=0.03). Clinically significant improvements were achieved by 7/21 in the CBT condition (33%), 3/19 in the SPT condition (16%) and 2/17 in the TAU condition (12%). Conclusions Cognitive—behavioural therapy delivered by clinical nurse specialists is a helpful adjunct to routine care for some people with chronic psychosis.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)303-311
    Number of pages9
    JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
    Volume182
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2003

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    Cognitive Therapy
    Clinical Trials
    Psychotherapy
    Therapeutics
    Nurse Clinicians
    Delusions
    Psychotic Disorders
    Schizophrenia
    Referral and Consultation

    Cite this

    Durham, R. C., Guthrie, M., Morton, R. V., Reid, D. A., Treliving, L. R., Fowler, D., & MacDonald, R. R. (2003). Tayside-Fife clinical trial of cognitive-behavioural therapy for medication-resistant psychotic symptoms: Results to 3-month follow-up. British Journal of Psychiatry, 182(4), 303-311. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.182.4.303
    Durham, Robert C. ; Guthrie, Moyra ; Morton, R. Victor ; Reid, David A. ; Treliving, Linda R. ; Fowler, David ; MacDonald, Ranald R. / Tayside-Fife clinical trial of cognitive-behavioural therapy for medication-resistant psychotic symptoms: Results to 3-month follow-up. In: British Journal of Psychiatry. 2003 ; Vol. 182, No. 4. pp. 303-311.
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    abstract = "Background Evidence for the efficacy of cognitive—behavioural therapy for schizophrenia is promising but evidence for clinical effectiveness is limited. Aims To test the effectiveness of cognitive—behavioural therapy delivered by clinical nurse specialists in routine practice. Method Of 274 referrals, 66 were allocated randomly to 9 months of treatment as usual (TAU), cognitive—behavioural therapy plus TAU (CBT) or supportive psychotherapy plus TAU (SPT) and followed up for 3 months. Results Treatment effects were modest but the CBT condition gave significantly greater improvement in overall symptom severity than the SPT or TAU conditions combined (F (1,53)=4.14; P=0.05). Both the CBT and SPT conditions combined gave significantly greater improvement in severity of delusions than did the TAU condition (F (1,53)=4.83; P=0.03). Clinically significant improvements were achieved by 7/21 in the CBT condition (33{\%}), 3/19 in the SPT condition (16{\%}) and 2/17 in the TAU condition (12{\%}). Conclusions Cognitive—behavioural therapy delivered by clinical nurse specialists is a helpful adjunct to routine care for some people with chronic psychosis.",
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    Tayside-Fife clinical trial of cognitive-behavioural therapy for medication-resistant psychotic symptoms: Results to 3-month follow-up. / Durham, Robert C.; Guthrie, Moyra; Morton, R. Victor; Reid, David A.; Treliving, Linda R.; Fowler, David; MacDonald, Ranald R.

    In: British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 182, No. 4, 04.2003, p. 303-311.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Durham, Robert C.

    AU - Guthrie, Moyra

    AU - Morton, R. Victor

    AU - Reid, David A.

    AU - Treliving, Linda R.

    AU - Fowler, David

    AU - MacDonald, Ranald R.

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    N2 - Background Evidence for the efficacy of cognitive—behavioural therapy for schizophrenia is promising but evidence for clinical effectiveness is limited. Aims To test the effectiveness of cognitive—behavioural therapy delivered by clinical nurse specialists in routine practice. Method Of 274 referrals, 66 were allocated randomly to 9 months of treatment as usual (TAU), cognitive—behavioural therapy plus TAU (CBT) or supportive psychotherapy plus TAU (SPT) and followed up for 3 months. Results Treatment effects were modest but the CBT condition gave significantly greater improvement in overall symptom severity than the SPT or TAU conditions combined (F (1,53)=4.14; P=0.05). Both the CBT and SPT conditions combined gave significantly greater improvement in severity of delusions than did the TAU condition (F (1,53)=4.83; P=0.03). Clinically significant improvements were achieved by 7/21 in the CBT condition (33%), 3/19 in the SPT condition (16%) and 2/17 in the TAU condition (12%). Conclusions Cognitive—behavioural therapy delivered by clinical nurse specialists is a helpful adjunct to routine care for some people with chronic psychosis.

    AB - Background Evidence for the efficacy of cognitive—behavioural therapy for schizophrenia is promising but evidence for clinical effectiveness is limited. Aims To test the effectiveness of cognitive—behavioural therapy delivered by clinical nurse specialists in routine practice. Method Of 274 referrals, 66 were allocated randomly to 9 months of treatment as usual (TAU), cognitive—behavioural therapy plus TAU (CBT) or supportive psychotherapy plus TAU (SPT) and followed up for 3 months. Results Treatment effects were modest but the CBT condition gave significantly greater improvement in overall symptom severity than the SPT or TAU conditions combined (F (1,53)=4.14; P=0.05). Both the CBT and SPT conditions combined gave significantly greater improvement in severity of delusions than did the TAU condition (F (1,53)=4.83; P=0.03). Clinically significant improvements were achieved by 7/21 in the CBT condition (33%), 3/19 in the SPT condition (16%) and 2/17 in the TAU condition (12%). Conclusions Cognitive—behavioural therapy delivered by clinical nurse specialists is a helpful adjunct to routine care for some people with chronic psychosis.

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