The effect of temperature on the male and female recombination landscape of barley

Dylan Phillips, Glyn Jenkins, Malcolm Macaulay, Candida Nibau, Joanna Wnetrzak, Derek Fallding, Isabelle Colas, Helena Oakey, Robbie Waugh, Luke Ramsay (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is a crop of global significance. However, a third of the genes of barley are largely inaccessible to conventional breeding programmes as crossovers are localised to the ends of the chromosomes. This work examines whether crossovers can be shifted to more proximal regions simply by elevating growth temperature. We utilised a genome-wide marker set for linkage analysis combined with cytological mapping of crossover events to examine the recombination landscape of plants grown at different temperatures. We found that barley shows heterochiasmy, that is, differences between female and male recombination frequencies. In addition, we found that elevated temperature significantly changes patterns of recombination in male meiosis only, with a repositioning of Class I crossovers determined by cytological mapping of HvMLH3 foci. We show that the length of synaptonemal complexes in male meiocytes increases in response to temperature. The results demonstrate that the distribution of crossover events are malleable and can be shifted to proximal regions by altering the growth temperature. The shift in recombination is the result of altering the distribution of Class I crossovers, but the higher recombination at elevated temperatures is potentially not the result of an increase in Class I events.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)421-429
Number of pages9
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume208
Issue number2
Early online date7 Aug 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015

Fingerprint

Hordeum
Genetic Recombination
barley
Temperature
temperature
Synaptonemal Complex
synaptonemal complex
Meiosis
Growth
ornamental plants
meiosis
Hordeum vulgare
Breeding
linkage (genetics)
Chromosomes
Genome
chromosomes
genome
breeding
crops

Keywords

  • Barley (Hordeum vulgare)
  • Crossover
  • Heterochiasmy
  • MLH3
  • Recombination
  • Synaptonemal complex

Cite this

Phillips, D., Jenkins, G., Macaulay, M., Nibau, C., Wnetrzak, J., Fallding, D., ... Ramsay, L. (2015). The effect of temperature on the male and female recombination landscape of barley. New Phytologist, 208(2), 421-429. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.13548
Phillips, Dylan ; Jenkins, Glyn ; Macaulay, Malcolm ; Nibau, Candida ; Wnetrzak, Joanna ; Fallding, Derek ; Colas, Isabelle ; Oakey, Helena ; Waugh, Robbie ; Ramsay, Luke. / The effect of temperature on the male and female recombination landscape of barley. In: New Phytologist. 2015 ; Vol. 208, No. 2. pp. 421-429.
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Phillips, D, Jenkins, G, Macaulay, M, Nibau, C, Wnetrzak, J, Fallding, D, Colas, I, Oakey, H, Waugh, R & Ramsay, L 2015, 'The effect of temperature on the male and female recombination landscape of barley', New Phytologist, vol. 208, no. 2, pp. 421-429. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.13548

The effect of temperature on the male and female recombination landscape of barley. / Phillips, Dylan; Jenkins, Glyn; Macaulay, Malcolm; Nibau, Candida; Wnetrzak, Joanna; Fallding, Derek; Colas, Isabelle; Oakey, Helena; Waugh, Robbie; Ramsay, Luke (Lead / Corresponding author).

In: New Phytologist, Vol. 208, No. 2, 10.2015, p. 421-429.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Phillips D, Jenkins G, Macaulay M, Nibau C, Wnetrzak J, Fallding D et al. The effect of temperature on the male and female recombination landscape of barley. New Phytologist. 2015 Oct;208(2):421-429. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.13548