The Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans originated in central Mexico rather than the Andes

Erica M. Goss, Javier F. Tabima, David E. L. Cooke, Silvia Restrepo, William E. Fry, Gregory A. Forbes, Valerie J. Fieland, Martha Cardenas, Niklaus J. Grünwald (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Phytophthora infestans is a destructive plant pathogen best known for causing the disease that triggered the Irish potato famine and remains the most costly potato pathogen to manage worldwide. Identification of P. infestan's elusive center of origin is critical to understanding the mechanisms of repeated global emergence of this pathogen. There are two competing theories, placing the origin in either South America or in central Mexico, both of which are centers of diversity of Solanum host plants. To test these competing hypotheses, we conducted detailed phylogeographic and approximate Bayesian computation analyses, which are suitable approaches to unraveling complex demographic histories. Our analyses used microsatellite markers and sequences of four nuclear genes sampled from populations in the Andes, Mexico, and elsewhere. To infer the ancestral state, we included the closest known relatives Phytophthora phaseoli, Phytophthora mirabilis, and Phytophthora ipomoeae, as well as the interspecific hybrid Phytophthora andina. We did not find support for an Andean origin of P. infestans; rather, the sequence data suggest a Mexican origin. Our findings support the hypothesis that populations found in the Andes are descendants of the Mexican populations and reconcile previous findings of ancestral variation in the Andes. Although centers of origin are well documented as centers of evolution and diversity for numerous crop plants, the number of plant pathogens with a known geographic origin are limited. This work has important implications for our understanding of the coevolution of hosts and pathogens, as well as the harnessing of plant disease resistance to manage late blight.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8791-8796
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume111
Issue number24
Early online date2 Jun 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Jun 2014

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Phytophthora infestans
Phytophthora
Solanum tuberosum
Starvation
Mexico
Mirabilis
Population
Plant Diseases
Solanum
Disease Resistance
Bayes Theorem
South America
Microsatellite Repeats
Demography
Genes

Cite this

Goss, Erica M. ; Tabima, Javier F. ; Cooke, David E. L. ; Restrepo, Silvia ; Fry, William E. ; Forbes, Gregory A. ; Fieland, Valerie J. ; Cardenas, Martha ; Grünwald, Niklaus J. . / The Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans originated in central Mexico rather than the Andes. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2014 ; Vol. 111, No. 24. pp. 8791-8796.
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Goss, EM, Tabima, JF, Cooke, DEL, Restrepo, S, Fry, WE, Forbes, GA, Fieland, VJ, Cardenas, M & Grünwald, NJ 2014, 'The Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans originated in central Mexico rather than the Andes', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 111, no. 24, pp. 8791-8796. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1401884111

The Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans originated in central Mexico rather than the Andes. / Goss, Erica M.; Tabima, Javier F.; Cooke, David E. L.; Restrepo, Silvia; Fry, William E.; Forbes, Gregory A.; Fieland, Valerie J.; Cardenas, Martha; Grünwald, Niklaus J. (Lead / Corresponding author).

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 111, No. 24, 17.06.2014, p. 8791-8796.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Tabima, Javier F.

AU - Cooke, David E. L.

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