The perspectives of students with autism spectrum disorder making the transition to secondary school in Scotland

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

    Abstract

    The inclusion of students with additional support needs has been at the forefront of educational policy and practice in Scotland in recent years. National legislation imposes duties on local authorities to make provision for children and young people who may require additional help at various points in their education. This presentation will report on the experiences of a group of nine male students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who were aged 11-12 years at the start of the study. All the students were in the final year of mainstream primary school and were making the transition to secondary school. The transition to secondary school, which typically takes place at 11 to 12 years of age, is important for all students. For students with ASD, who have difficulties with changes in routine, it is especially important that this transition is carefully managed. In this study, following the transfer to secondary school, the students’ retrospective views of transition and of the utility of the transition programme were explored using group discussion activities and semi-structured interviews. The students reported anticipatory concerns about a number of aspects of secondary school life. The transition experience was associated with mixed feelings of anxiety and excitement. Overall, the students’ experiences were better than expected. Students valued the transition programme activities and the opportunity to meet other students with ASD, reporting that it had a positive impact on their experience of the transition. Finally, implications for policy and practice are considered.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 2009
    EventSchool Psychology for Diversity: 31st International School Psychology Association (ISPA) Conference - St Paul's Bay, Malta
    Duration: 7 Jul 200911 Jul 2009

    Conference

    ConferenceSchool Psychology for Diversity: 31st International School Psychology Association (ISPA) Conference
    CountryMalta
    CitySt Paul's Bay
    Period7/07/0911/07/09

    Fingerprint

    autism
    secondary school
    student
    experience
    educational practice
    educational policy
    group discussion
    primary school
    legislation
    inclusion
    anxiety
    interview

    Keywords

    • Autism
    • Autistic children
    • Special needs children
    • Secondary schools
    • Scotland

    Cite this

    Hannah, E. (2009). The perspectives of students with autism spectrum disorder making the transition to secondary school in Scotland. Poster session presented at School Psychology for Diversity: 31st International School Psychology Association (ISPA) Conference, St Paul's Bay, Malta.
    Hannah, Elizabeth. / The perspectives of students with autism spectrum disorder making the transition to secondary school in Scotland. Poster session presented at School Psychology for Diversity: 31st International School Psychology Association (ISPA) Conference, St Paul's Bay, Malta.
    @conference{3e8afbf9c5df4555b5bd3b3ad671317c,
    title = "The perspectives of students with autism spectrum disorder making the transition to secondary school in Scotland",
    abstract = "The inclusion of students with additional support needs has been at the forefront of educational policy and practice in Scotland in recent years. National legislation imposes duties on local authorities to make provision for children and young people who may require additional help at various points in their education. This presentation will report on the experiences of a group of nine male students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who were aged 11-12 years at the start of the study. All the students were in the final year of mainstream primary school and were making the transition to secondary school. The transition to secondary school, which typically takes place at 11 to 12 years of age, is important for all students. For students with ASD, who have difficulties with changes in routine, it is especially important that this transition is carefully managed. In this study, following the transfer to secondary school, the students’ retrospective views of transition and of the utility of the transition programme were explored using group discussion activities and semi-structured interviews. The students reported anticipatory concerns about a number of aspects of secondary school life. The transition experience was associated with mixed feelings of anxiety and excitement. Overall, the students’ experiences were better than expected. Students valued the transition programme activities and the opportunity to meet other students with ASD, reporting that it had a positive impact on their experience of the transition. Finally, implications for policy and practice are considered.",
    keywords = "Autism, Autistic children, Special needs children, Secondary schools, Scotland",
    author = "Elizabeth Hannah",
    year = "2009",
    language = "English",
    note = "School Psychology for Diversity: 31st International School Psychology Association (ISPA) Conference ; Conference date: 07-07-2009 Through 11-07-2009",

    }

    Hannah, E 2009, 'The perspectives of students with autism spectrum disorder making the transition to secondary school in Scotland' School Psychology for Diversity: 31st International School Psychology Association (ISPA) Conference, St Paul's Bay, Malta, 7/07/09 - 11/07/09, .

    The perspectives of students with autism spectrum disorder making the transition to secondary school in Scotland. / Hannah, Elizabeth.

    2009. Poster session presented at School Psychology for Diversity: 31st International School Psychology Association (ISPA) Conference, St Paul's Bay, Malta.

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

    TY - CONF

    T1 - The perspectives of students with autism spectrum disorder making the transition to secondary school in Scotland

    AU - Hannah, Elizabeth

    PY - 2009

    Y1 - 2009

    N2 - The inclusion of students with additional support needs has been at the forefront of educational policy and practice in Scotland in recent years. National legislation imposes duties on local authorities to make provision for children and young people who may require additional help at various points in their education. This presentation will report on the experiences of a group of nine male students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who were aged 11-12 years at the start of the study. All the students were in the final year of mainstream primary school and were making the transition to secondary school. The transition to secondary school, which typically takes place at 11 to 12 years of age, is important for all students. For students with ASD, who have difficulties with changes in routine, it is especially important that this transition is carefully managed. In this study, following the transfer to secondary school, the students’ retrospective views of transition and of the utility of the transition programme were explored using group discussion activities and semi-structured interviews. The students reported anticipatory concerns about a number of aspects of secondary school life. The transition experience was associated with mixed feelings of anxiety and excitement. Overall, the students’ experiences were better than expected. Students valued the transition programme activities and the opportunity to meet other students with ASD, reporting that it had a positive impact on their experience of the transition. Finally, implications for policy and practice are considered.

    AB - The inclusion of students with additional support needs has been at the forefront of educational policy and practice in Scotland in recent years. National legislation imposes duties on local authorities to make provision for children and young people who may require additional help at various points in their education. This presentation will report on the experiences of a group of nine male students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who were aged 11-12 years at the start of the study. All the students were in the final year of mainstream primary school and were making the transition to secondary school. The transition to secondary school, which typically takes place at 11 to 12 years of age, is important for all students. For students with ASD, who have difficulties with changes in routine, it is especially important that this transition is carefully managed. In this study, following the transfer to secondary school, the students’ retrospective views of transition and of the utility of the transition programme were explored using group discussion activities and semi-structured interviews. The students reported anticipatory concerns about a number of aspects of secondary school life. The transition experience was associated with mixed feelings of anxiety and excitement. Overall, the students’ experiences were better than expected. Students valued the transition programme activities and the opportunity to meet other students with ASD, reporting that it had a positive impact on their experience of the transition. Finally, implications for policy and practice are considered.

    KW - Autism

    KW - Autistic children

    KW - Special needs children

    KW - Secondary schools

    KW - Scotland

    M3 - Poster

    ER -

    Hannah E. The perspectives of students with autism spectrum disorder making the transition to secondary school in Scotland. 2009. Poster session presented at School Psychology for Diversity: 31st International School Psychology Association (ISPA) Conference, St Paul's Bay, Malta.