'The space of what is gone…' : A solo exhibition of a newly created body of work

Brigid Collins (Artist)

    Research output: Non-textual formExhibition

    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 2002
    Event"The space of what is gone…" - Edinburgh, United Kingdom
    Duration: 8 Aug 200231 Aug 2002
    http://www.brigidcollins.co.uk/photo_5317294.html

    Cite this

    @misc{ada5d4ddce6f47c49302b5431ee3613e,
    title = "'The space of what is gone…' : A solo exhibition of a newly created body of work",
    author = "Brigid Collins",
    note = "This exhibition represents a dissemination of research into relationships between word, image and architectural space. It can be seen to fit within the context of the existing research of Dr. Valerie Robillard and others into the notion of ‘Ekphrasis’, focusing on the process of designing what can be seen as maquettes for interior architectural space, by using both the form and the feeling of poetry as a starting point. Made in response to specific poems by poets John Burnside, Diana Hendry, Brian Johnstone and Kevin MacNeil, the 31 pieces in this exhibition comprise ‘Poem-Houses’. These represent a reversal of the ‘Ekphrastic’ model of Dr. Valerie Robillard (University of Groningen), outlined in ‘Pictures Into Words’ (1998). ‘Ekphrasis’, a rhetorical term, refers to the way in which the verbal arts - poetry, for example - ‘translate’ elements of the visual arts to their own medium. However, cooperation between the arts has demonstrated that the ‘linguistic imperialism’ contained in what is essentially a one-sided definition of Ekphrasis needs to be revised, to accommodate the fact that visual artists are making translations from the verbal to the visual arts. A process of engaging in the gestural making of fragile three-dimensional objects/maquettes/’drafts’, echoes that of a poet, when writing/making/drafting a poem. This approach to texts signals a clear departure from the word ‘illustration’ as an umbrella term for the manner in which visual texts respond the verbal texts, focusing instead on the myriad ways by which one can imitate the structural, referential, metaphorical, and dialogical conventions of the other. dc.format: 31 pieces",
    year = "2002",
    language = "English",

    }

    'The space of what is gone…' : A solo exhibition of a newly created body of work. Collins, Brigid (Artist). 2002. Event: "The space of what is gone…", Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

    Research output: Non-textual formExhibition

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    A2 - Collins, Brigid

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    PY - 2002

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    M3 - Exhibition

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